Fort Berthold Reservation in 1950

To learn more, follow the 10 links in the graphic.

map: Fort Berthold Reservation in 1950

link to Journal entry for April 14, 1805 link to Journal entry for April 13, 1805 link to Journal entry for August 12, 1806 link to Journal entry for April 12, 1805 link to Journal entry for April 11, 1805 link to Journal entry for April 10, 1805 link to photo of Elbowoods after evacuation for dam construction link to page about Fort Berthold link to page on Independence Valley link to photo of Mandan ferry in 1904

The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 turned federal Indian policies away from the paternalistic objectives of de-culturalization and assimilation. Tribal self-government was facilitated, and the people of Fort Berthold Reservation became a new political entity—the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation. The revival of traditional cultural values was encouraged. The federal Civilian Conservation Corps improved roads and schools. A bridge was built from Elbowoods to the south side of the Missouri River, and named in honor of two leaders, one Mandan, the other a Hidatsa, both called Four Bears.

The 1940's brought severe floods on the Missouri, followed by taxpayer demands that the government do something about the problem. The solution was to build a series of dams for flood control, irrigation and power generation. Over the objections of the Three Affiliated Tribes, the Corps of Engineers took 152,300 acres of their land for the reservoir to be impounded by Garrison Dam, thirty miles downstream from the southeast boundary of the Reservation.